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Name Hours Phone Address City State Zip Type Park Sevice Area District ADA Parking Restrooms Acreage SqFt Latitiude Longitude Description Photo URL
AIDS Memorial Grove 5am to Midnight (415) 765-0497 Middle Dr East & Bowling Green Dr San Francisco CA 94102 Lake or Ornamental Garden GGP District 1 Accessible Yes No 336,540 37.7696311 -122.4623207

The National AIDS Memorial Grove is a living tribute to all whose lives have been touched by AIDS, and a dedicated space where people can gather to heal, hope, and remember. Its purpose is to ensure that those who have suffered from the AIDS epidemic — both those who have died and those who have shared their struggle — are not forgotten. It is a place for quiet reflection among the rhododendrons and redwoods, where people can seek out solitude or gather in groups for memorial services, celebrations, and picnics. Near the eastern entry is the Circle of Friends, a circular stone plaza in which names of those who have been touched by AIDS are inscribed, and where many leave informal remembrances to loved ones. In the middle section of the grove is a sunny meadow; from there, trails wind up through the Fern Grotto and Circle of Peace to the western entry.

The idea for the grove was first proposed in 1988, and in 1991 renovation began on the chosen site, de Laveaga Dell. Architects and designers volunteered their services to create a landscaping plan for the neglected and overgrown site, and thousands of volunteers have now donated tens of thousands of hours to clearing, planting, and maintaining the grove. Native trees, shrubs, and other plants have been reintroduced, paths and benches installed, and boulders of Sierra granite placed; site improvements are ongoing. Several pathways wind through groves of dogwood, redwood, oak, and pine trees, and at the western end, lush ferns tower overhead in the Fern Grotto. Much of the grove is wheelchair-accessible. In 1996, the grove was designated an official national memorial by Congress and the president.

The grove is designed primarily for use by individuals and small groups, but larger groups may also use it for memorial services, weddings, commitment ceremonies, picnics, and other celebrations. All events require permission, and fees are charged for larger events. For more information about guidelines and permits, see www.aidsmemorial.org.

The National AIDS Memorial Grove is located in the eastern end of Golden Gate Park, at the intersection of Bowling Green and Middle Drive East, across from the tennis courts.

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Arizona Garden 5am to Midnight Stanyan & Great Hwy , 94117 San Francisco CA 94102 Lake or Ornamental Garden GGP District 1 Accessible Yes Yes 26,135 37.7726198 -122.4588540

“Golden Gate Park never stops blooming, and its gardeners never stop working. The entire park is a garden created out of sand dunes by gardeners’ hands in the 1870s, and generations of gardeners since then have planted many rare and exotic plants throughout the park. And because San Francisco has very little frost and ample winter rain, there is always something growing, flowering, going to seed, or changing color here.

Although Golden Gate Park has beautiful destination gardens, it was designed for folks to “”get lost.”” Wander any trail and you will find interesting features, surprising plants, magnificent tree groves, and sunny glades. And did you know that there are ten lakes in the park?”

Camellia Garden 5am to Midnight Stanyan & Great Hwy , 94117 San Francisco CA 94102 Lake or Ornamental Garden GGP District 1 Accessible Yes Yes 212,568 37.7722894 -122.4568629

“Golden Gate Park never stops blooming, and its gardeners never stop working. The entire park is a garden created out of sand dunes by gardeners’ hands in the 1870s, and generations of gardeners since then have planted many rare and exotic plants throughout the park. And because San Francisco has very little frost and ample winter rain, there is always something growing, flowering, going to seed, or changing color here.

Although Golden Gate Park has beautiful destination gardens, it was designed for folks to “”get lost.”” Wander any trail and you will find interesting features, surprising plants, magnificent tree groves, and sunny glades. And did you know that there are ten lakes in the park?”

Chain of Lakes 5am to Midnight Chain of Lakes Dr and John F Kennedy Dr San Francisco CA 94121 Lake or Ornamental Garden GGP 37.7682500 -122.5005400

Before Golden Gate Park’s builders transformed the landscape, there were 14 marshy lakes nestled within the sand dunes that covered this part of San Francisco. Now only five remain, including the Chain of Lakes — North, Middle, and South — although they have been substantially altered. The rest of the park’s lakes are artificial.

The Chain of Lakes is a welcome respite from the city’s hustle and bustle. In spring, songbirds trill in the bushes and hummingbirds and dragonflies dart here and there, flashing brilliantly in the sunshine. The paved path that follows North Lake’s perimeter is a favorite of parents pushing strollers, as well as joggers and dog-walkers. Middle Lake feels a little wilder, with thick vegetation and a dirt trail meandering through a eucalyptus forest.

The lakes are a favored spot for birdwatching, attracting many migrant species as well as year-round residents. Middle Lake, bordered by dense vegetation on three sides, has the best birding opportunities, with many migrant land birds, including tanagers, warblers, and vireos. North Lake, the largest, is known for attracting water birds, many of which take shelter on its small islands. You may see egrets, great blue herons, belted kingfishers, and many types of ducks. Tiny South Lake attracts the least birds, but there are usually at least a few ducks to be seen.

The Chain of Lakes stretch along Chain of Lakes Drive from Martin Luther King Jr. Drive at the park’s southern end to Fulton Street, at its northern edge.

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Dahlia Garden 5am to Midnight Stanyan & Great Hwy , 94117 San Francisco CA 94102 Lake or Ornamental Garden GGP District 1 Accessible Yes Yes 3,623 37.7724875 -122.4592313

“Golden Gate Park never stops blooming, and its gardeners never stop working. The entire park is a garden created out of sand dunes by gardeners’ hands in the 1870s, and generations of gardeners since then have planted many rare and exotic plants throughout the park. And because San Francisco has very little frost and ample winter rain, there is always something growing, flowering, going to seed, or changing color here.

Although Golden Gate Park has beautiful destination gardens, it was designed for folks to “”get lost.”” Wander any trail and you will find interesting features, surprising plants, magnificent tree groves, and sunny glades. And did you know that there are ten lakes in the park?”

Fay Park Garden 5am to Midnight 2366 Leavenworth St , 94133 San Francisco CA 94102 Lake or Ornamental Garden PSA 1 District 3 Limited Wheelchair Access Yes Yes 442 37.8029516 -122.4177360

Talk about your secret gardens. Fay Park, just a block from the bottom of Lombard Street, “the crookedest street in San Francisco,” is this quintessential park jewel, tucked away on the corner of Leavenworth and Chestnut. Featuring a rose garden and two gazebos, Fay Park is fast becoming one of the city’s most sought after wedding sites.

Fuchsia Dell 5am to Midnight Stanyan & Great Hwy , 94117 San Francisco CA 94102 Lake or Ornamental Garden GGP District 1 Accessible Yes Yes 54,695 37.7731666 -122.4565050

The Fuchsia Dell (or Garden) of Golden Gate Park was established in 1940 and is located east of the Conservatory of Flowers. It offers various walking paths and plantings that display a beautiful showing of blossoms and shrubs, along with a sundial on a pedestal mounted dial plate that was installed in 1983. The entrance can be found at Conservatory Drive East a few hundred yards north of JFK drive. The garden begins to bloom in May and continues into November, though there are many other trees and shrubs in the area that bloom the rest of the year.

Japanese Tea Garden 75 Hagiwara Tea Garden Drive , 94118 CA Lake or Ornamental Garden GGP District 1 Accessible Yes Yes 121,492 37.7700417 -122.4700776

The Japanese Tea Garden in Golden Gate Park is the oldest in the United States, created for the 1894 California Midwinter International Exposition as part of the fair’s Japanese Village exhibit. The garden’s lush, harmonious landscaping pays homage to the traditional Japanese art of the garden. Paths wind through its five acres of carefully chosen and manicured plants, including Japanese maples, towering stands of bamboo, an ancient wisteria, and cherry trees that put on a spectacular flowering display in March and April. Among the garden’s other trees and shrubs are pines, cedars, azaleas, magnolias, camellias, and a superb collection of bonsai and other intricately shaped plants.

The grounds also feature a series of koi ponds, elaborate carved wood gates, many stone lanterns, a five-story pagoda (dating from the Panama-Pacific International Exposition of 1915), a Zen Garden constructed of stones and gravel, a high-arching Drum Bridge (a relic of the original Japanese Village), and a teahouse and gift shop. A large bronze Buddha near the teahouse, cast in Japan in 1790, was presented to the garden by the Gump Company in 1949. The 9,000-pound bronze Peace Lantern situated behind the pagoda was bought with the contributions of Japanese schoolchildren and presented to the garden in 1953 in commemoration of the U.S.-Japan peace treaty signed in San Francisco in 1951.

Several people were responsible for creating the tea garden — including businessman George Turner Marsh and Golden Gate Park Superintendant John McLaren — but the driving force was Japanese immigrant Makoto Hagiwara, a wealthy landscape designer. After the exposition closed in 1894, the city decided to maintain the garden and purchased some of its features. Hagiwara became the official caretaker in 1895 and lived in the garden with his family until his death in 1925.

His descendants continued to manage the garden until 1942, when they were sent to an internment camp in Utah as part of the World War II relocation of all West Coast citizens of Japanese descent. Much of the Hagiwara family’s personal collection was removed from the garden at this time; during the war the family’s residence was demolished and the garden renamed the Oriental Tea Garden. The name was restored to Japanese Tea Garden in 1952. The collection of dwarf trees on Waterfall Hill, part of the Hagiwaras’ collection, was returned to the garden in 1965. A bronze plaque honoring the Hagiwara family, by artist Ruth Asawa, was installed just inside the garden’s main gate in 1974, and in 1986 the park’s Tea Garden Drive was renamed Hagiwara Tea Garden Drive.

The Japanese Tea Garden is at 7 Hagiwara Tea Garden Drive, at the northwestern edge of the Music Concourse, near Martin Luther King Jr. Drive.

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Queen Wilhelmina Tulip Garden 5am to Midnight John F Kenney Dr & Great Hwy , 94117 San Francisco CA 94102 Lake or Ornamental Garden GGP District 1 Accessible Yes Yes 13,567 37.7702285 -122.5091971

Motorized pumps were first installed in the Dutch Windmill in 1913 to augment the power system, and the Murphy Windmill was electrified soon after. It is commonly believed that the windmills were taken out of service around 1935, after which they began to deteriorate. A campaign to restore them began in 1964, but funding difficulties caused the Murphy Windmill to be dropped from the plan. Cosmetic repairs to the Dutch Windmill were completed in 1980, but it no longer functions. The Murphy Windmill is now undergoing extensive restoration.

The Queen Wilhelmina Tulip Garden, planted just below the Dutch Windmill, features thousands of tulips interspersed with Icelandic poppies, which burst into glorious flower in March and April.

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San Francisco Botanical Garden (415) 661-1316 9th Ave and Lincoln Way San Francisco CA 94118 Lake or Ornamental Garden GGP District 1 Accessible Yes Yes 37.7664700 -122.4666200

The San Francisco Botanical Garden at Strybing Arboretum grows and conserves plants from around the world — more than 8,000 varieties in 55 acres of landscaped gardens and open spaces. Stroll through a grove of coast redwoods and a Mediterranean garden, explore cloud forests from meso-America and southeast Asia, and wander gardens of flora from Chile, Australia, Japan, California, and more. The garden’s special collections include rhododendrons, camellias, magnolias, and succulents. The Garden of Fragrance, designed in 1965 to allow people with visual impairments to enjoy plants through touch and smell, features aromatic plants in beds made of stones from a 12th-century Spanish monastery brought to the United States by newspaper magnate William Randolph Hearst.

On warm days you will often see picnickers and loungers spread out on the Great Meadow. Children in particular love the waterfowl pond, where you’ll see egrets, ducks, and many other birds, and the moon-viewing garden, with its deck overlooking a turtle-shaped island. The Botanical Garden offers lectures, tours, and classes on subjects ranging from gardening to botanical illustration and photography, and its Youth Education Program serves over 10,000 schoolchildren every year through guided walks, storytime walks, a treasure hunt, and the hands-on Children’s Garden.

The Botanical Garden is also home to the Helen Crocker Russell Library of Horticulture, with 27,000 books and 450 periodicals covering all aspects of horticulture, from garden design and pest management to ethnobotany, botanical art, and children’s botanical books. Established in 1972, it is the largest such collection in northern California. The library hosts exhibits of botanical art and offers free children’s story times and family walks.

William Hammond Hall’s original plan for Golden Gate Park included a botanical garden, and in 1890 the park’s superintendent, John McLaren, identified the current site as appropriate and began planting trees. But funds to develop the garden did not become available until Helene Strybing left a bequest to the city in 1926. Construction began in 1937, and the arboretum opened to the public in 1940.

The San Francisco Botanical Garden is near the corner of Ninth Avenue and Lincoln Way in Golden Gate Park.

Accessibility

Most of the Garden’s pathways are wheelchair accessible, and accessible pathways are marked on wayfinding signage with the ISA symbol ADA icon.

Complimentary wheelchairs are available at either Garden entrance on a first come, first served basis.

Accessible restrooms are located near the Friend Gate, at the North entrance to the Botanical Garden at Martin Luther King Jr. Drive and Tea Garden Drive.

There are also restrooms inside the Library building adjacent to the main entrance, and in the Great Meadow. These restrooms are not accessible.

This link will take you to a printable map showing the location of the accessible restroom and accessible paths of travel.

Click this link for more information on San Francisco Recreation and Parks accessibility, including requesting accommodations.

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Shakespeare Garden 5am to Midnight 55 Music Concourse Dr San Francisco CA 94118 Lake or Ornamental Garden GGP District 1 Accessible Yes No 37.7688890 -122.4672440

A Shakespeare garden is a themed garden that cultivates plants mentioned in the works of William Shakespeare. In English-speaking countries, particularly the United States, these are often public gardens associated with parks, universities, and Shakespeare festivals. Shakespeare gardens are sites of cultural, educational, and romantic interest and can be locations for outdoor weddings.

Signs near the plants usually provide relevant quotations. A Shakespeare garden usually includes several dozen species, either in herbaceous profusion or in a geometric layout with boxwood dividers. Typical amenities are walkways and benches and a weather-resistant bust of Shakespeare. Shakespeare gardens may accompany reproductions of Elizabethan architecture. Some Shakespeare gardens also grow species typical of the Elizabethan period but not mentioned in Shakespeare’s plays or poetry.

Courtesy of WikiPedia

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Stow Lake 5am to Midnight Stow Lake Drive San Francisco CA 94118 Lake or Ornamental Garden GGP District 1 Accessible Yes Yes 37.7704700 -122.4770600

Golden Gate Park’s largest body of water, Stow Lake is a popular spot for strolling, picnicking, and pedaling around in boats, which can be rented at the boathouse. Created in 1893, the lake was designed for leisure boating, as a promenade for horse-drawn carriages, and as a reservoir for park irrigation. The 12-acre doughnut-shaped lake surrounds Strawberry Hill Island, a wooded hill named for the wild strawberries that once flourished on its flanks.

A trail follows the lake’s perimeter, passing Huntington Falls, a 110-foot artificial waterfall that cascades from another reservoir higher up on Strawberry Hill; the Golden Gate Pavilion, a colorful Chinese pagoda presented to San Francisco by its sister city Taipei in 1976; and the Stone (or Rustic) Bridge, built in 1893, and Roman Bridge.

Both bridges connect the lakeshore trail to Strawberry Hill Island, where trails follow the shoreline and climb to the hill’s summit, the highest point in Golden Gate Park at more than 400 feet. You can still catch glimpses of the city through the thick groves of trees, but in the 1890s the hill provided sweeping views. Sweeney’s Observatory, an elaborate castle-like structure built on the summit in 1891, was actually a vista point. Horse-drawn carriages took visitors around the lake and up to the observatory until 1906, when it was destroyed in the great earthquake.

Stow Lake Boathouse, on the lake’s north shore, rents pedal boats, row boats, and has a snack bar. The current building, built in 1946, replaced the original 1893 boathouse.

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